Wednesday, August 5, 2020
Home November 2018

November 2018

Where Technocracy Ends The other day, since I couldn’t recall, I googled “What was I just thinking about?” and the computer would not give me the correct information to my inquiry. I asked it this question a million times over and every time it gave me the wrong answer. It felt good knowing there were still some...

Poems by Tissy Taylor

SHATTER Glass wall inside of me Looking to where I want to be How this widowed heart hides In plain sight, wishing to be seen False light is blinding me Until I can no longer breathe Quiet madness beguiles This raging fire, consuming Masked her wall of pretend Fettered anguish lingers within Imprisoned by the tides In murky depths a life...
They Won’t Forget to Pray (verses in response to “So Long Marianne”) In the night, you asked for silence to speak to angels for Marianne, for Marianne. You opened your lips and dry as they were still breathed the confession of stillness. Darkness approached as you addressed love in its trembling thoughts. I can’t hear your voice. It is quiet and...
Civil Guardsmen From a field of grasses dried by wind, two civil guardsmen stare toward the sun for traffic on the lonely road they have been stationed to protect. They are tall against the burnt horizon, still as the ground itself, and one is the reflection of the other as, side by side, they stand in place. Should one turn around,...
Linda Ashok Do you have any guess for this deep seated aversion for the “spoken word” in general? Why literary critics and practitioners exclude the spoken word from the scope of their literary pursuit? When the paper wasn’t invented and writing was yet to become a norm on paper but...
Jagari Mukherjee The story of post-independence Indian English poetry can be traced to Nissim Ezekiel’s A Time To Change (1952). Since then, Indian English poetry has grown in leaps and bounds, with luminaries like Dom Moraes, Arun Kolatkar, Adil Jussawala, A.K. Ramanujan, Dilip Chitre, Keki Daruwala, and Jayanta Mahapatra dominating...

Introduction

Introduction: It takes guts to speak with artistes, especially poets. They are sensitive, they refuse to speak much about themselves (here I’m talking about old-time poets, the present clan is more vocal), and it is even more difficult to understand their mood and psyche. When I asked Nikita Parik, assistant...
“The maker has no control. This is sortilege, the magic of inditing.” Hello Sanjeevji! It’s a pleasure to be interviewing you. Let me tell you, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed Nine Summers Later, and This Summer and That Summer, your latest release. I’ve also read a bunch of your newer poems among...
Anuparna Mukherjee In the wake of #MeToo campaign that has taken the social media by storm, it is alarming but perhaps not surprising to see the sheer number of women who have come forward with their traumatic experiences. It is true that there is a large number who chose to...
Subramanian Shankar I first read Naipaul in Malaysia as a teenager. I would check out his books from the library of the club to which my family belonged. I recognized the world that Naipaul described in early books like A House for Mr. Biswas and Miguel Street, though I had...

Vale of Tears

Terry Sanville 1. On Friday morning, Dad took Shasta, our shorthaired terrier with a white-tipped tail, to the vet. I didn’t even know the poor dog was sick. At seven, I didn’t understand illness and suffering. But my older sister, Betty, seemed to know. She waited with me in the living...

Ticket to Romance

J. Ross Archer The blinking red, white, and blue lights I saw in my rear-view mirror startled me. Daydreaming, I must have not been paying attention to how fast I was driving. I pulled over and waited for the officer to approach my car. I knew to be aware of...