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November 2018

Jagari Mukherjee The story of post-independence Indian English poetry can be traced to Nissim Ezekiel’s A Time To Change (1952). Since then, Indian English poetry has grown in leaps and bounds, with luminaries like Dom Moraes, Arun Kolatkar, Adil Jussawala, A.K. Ramanujan, Dilip Chitre, Keki Daruwala, and Jayanta Mahapatra dominating...
Not Garden-Variety In dirge of desires fear transacts with hedge of hesitancy to keep pace with striptease of tides. Come-on by tits or tattoo on hineys stir intuitively. Primer of pomology has other clauses some read some unread. Fruition isn’t for everyone. Prescription Towels loll in the sun after mopping wet bodies, you and I wipe each other with our skins in lambency in another episode of linkages. Equipping...
“The maker has no control. This is sortilege, the magic of inditing.” Hello Sanjeevji! It’s a pleasure to be interviewing you. Let me tell you, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed Nine Summers Later, and This Summer and That Summer, your latest release. I’ve also read a bunch of your newer poems among...
A Unique Blend of the Familiar with the Experimental   When you undress a poem with dignity, delicately like a lover, it will disrobe you of excess, accessing your inner feelings (“Conduction”)   In the fifty-one poems included in his much-acclaimed third collection of poetry titled This Summer and That Summer (Bloomsbury 2015), Sanjeev Sethi manages...
Kiriti Sengupta I forget the poems I write. I don’t blame memory. Thanks to the two molar teeth I lost in spite of being a dental surgeon. They were badly broken. I had excruciating pain and did not listen to the consultant who had advised Root Canal Therapy. I wanted...

Introduction

Introduction: It takes guts to speak with artistes, especially poets. They are sensitive, they refuse to speak much about themselves (here I’m talking about old-time poets, the present clan is more vocal), and it is even more difficult to understand their mood and psyche. When I asked Nikita Parik, assistant...
Linda Ashok Do you have any guess for this deep seated aversion for the “spoken word” in general? Why literary critics and practitioners exclude the spoken word from the scope of their literary pursuit? When the paper wasn’t invented and writing was yet to become a norm on paper but...
REFLECTIONS Those Who Pass Slowly , slowly they pass by Those who breastfed and put us to bed who worked hard to send us to schools and colleges those who scolded and punished us who revered and envied us, hugged and desired us, those who longed for our death, one by one, slowly, slowly. Slowly ,slowly A part of us too...

Poems by John Hennessy

AFTER ALEXANDRIA What an agony not to wake up next to you. Not to have fallen asleep with your head on my chest. I made the bed quickly, as you did every day, sheets that still smell of your hair and skin. Your pillows, one that you took with you, take with you everywhere, sandalwood...
My Guest There is nothing more important than you, my guest I will delay my sickness until you leave And I will cover my sadness with a big smile I will give my last bread to you and my hungry kids Don’t worry— I will fill my stomach with water Come on in… My house is full...
Anuparna Mukherjee In the wake of #MeToo campaign that has taken the social media by storm, it is alarming but perhaps not surprising to see the sheer number of women who have come forward with their traumatic experiences. It is true that there is a large number who chose to...

From a Feminist Lens

Nikita Parik Caked in mud caged in faith prayers keep me alive 108 names but I recognize none (“Devi 2.0”) The binaries of personal and public must be subverted when seemingly personal concerns voiced through personal expressions transcend to achieve a universality of sorts. In her debut poetry book, Apostrophe, Barnali Ray Shukla’s versification of seemingly...